Poetry Friday: The Night Is A Big Black Cat

Poetry Friday…this week’s links are at Margaret Simon’s blog, Reflections on the Teche.

Photo by Michael J. Bennett via Wikimedia Commons

 The night is a big black cat.

The moon is her topaz eye.

The stars are the mice she hunts at night

in the field of the sultry sky.

G. Orr Clark

G. Orr Clark also wrote a children’s book called “The Moon-Babies” around 1900, and had three pieces in Harper’s magazine in 1902. The children’s book is over two hundred dollars on Amazon, and Harper’s archives are available by subscription only. So I’m left with this one poem to love. And I do!

Speaking of love, and black cats, visit illustrator Judy Watson’s blog to see how she made a wonderful black cat sculpture out of paper lunch bags.

Poetry Friday: By Water’s Edge

Hello, Poetry Friday. This week’s links are at Sylvia Vardell’s blog, Poetry for Children. Sylvia’s also putting out a call for celebration-themed poems for the next installment of the Poetry Friday Anthology, and shares an example with a fun poem called “Hooray for Dogs” by Janet Wong.

Now I’d like to share a wonderful picture book by author Kay Barone.

“The Green Dory” by Winslow Homer, 1880, Public Domain

My local library is connected with a small art museum, home to many works of American art. Because of this, the library’s collection includes more art-related books than most public libraries. That’s why I was lucky to find a copy of “By Water’s Edge” by Kay Barone on one of the picture book shelves.

This quintessential summer picture book, published by the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, pairs thirteen of Winslow Homer’s artworks with Barone’s gentle rhyming text. It’s a perfect fit.

“Children Playing Under a Gloucester Wharf,” Winslow Homer, 1880, Public Domain

“Who will have fun with a tied up boat?

“Who will tilt it gently, who will watch it float?”

Author/poet/teacher Kay Barone died in 2010, and “By Water’s Edge” was her only picture book. It might be difficult to find a copy, but it would make a timeless addition to any children’s book collection.

Text Excerpt from: “By Water’s Edge” by Kay Barone, Boston Museum of Fine Arts, 1996

Poetry Friday: Book Spine Haiku

Poetry Friday time! There are all kinds of wonderful links at Tabatha Yeatts’ blog, The Opposite of Indifference. Go visit and see.

Does anyone else love playing with book spine poetry? My last one was a jump rope rhyme, so today is a change of pace.

IMG_1938

Island in the sun -
the little red fish
by water’s edge.

From: ISLAND IN THE SUN by Harry Belafonte and Lord Burgess with Illustrations by Alex Ayliffe; THE LITTLE RED FISH by Taeeun Yoo; BY WATER’S EDGE by Kay Barone.

Not Then But Now

“Colors of Pitanga” by Leo.dower via Wikimedia Commons

Hello, Poetry Friday. Here’s a small offering I saw on Twitter this week that seemed more poem than tweet to me. Just twelve words.

“Not then but now.

Not there but here.

Not that but this.”

(Tweeted by Everyday Mindfulness – @mindfuleveryday)

Poetry Friday is hosted by Jone at Check It Out today. She has lots of wonderful links over there.

Poem Movie Beauty

Poetry Friday is hosted today by Catherine M. Johnson. Visit her site to find many poetry links for the week.

Thank you to Carol at Carol’s Corner for explaining Poetry Friday to me. She shared this post by Tabatha Yeatts with me. It’s a great introduction to Poetry Friday, if you’re wondering how it works, too.

My contribution this week is a link to something small but wonderful. While thinking about the Poem Movie Challenge on Michelle Heidenrich Barnes’ blog, I came across this version of Claude McKay’s poem, THE TROPICS IN NEW YORK, on The Poetry Foundation’s site. The animation is gorgeous, and Ziggy Marley’s reading is unforgettable. I hope you’ll like it, too.Mackey

Claude McKay, Wikimedia Commons

 

 

Wading

Thanks to Michelle Heidenrich Barnes at Today’s Little Ditty for including my cinquain “Wading” in the Ditty of the Month Club. I’ve read so many wonderful poets’ cinquains this month on her blog.

I wrote “Wading” from memories of Little Peconic Bay on Long Island, where I fished, swam, and explored, as a child.

Another Little Peconic Bay cinquain:

Throwing

my fishing line

into the restless bay.

I cast straight, but the current goes

sideways.

2014, Monica Gudlewski. All rights reserved.